2017 Year of Fun Reading: Wrap Up!

All good things must come to an end. Before I head off bravely into a brand-spanking new year, I have to pause for a moment to say farewell to my last year’s reading challenge, the Year of Fun Reading.

This was a reading challenge that I found on the blog of Modern Mrs. Darcy (if you don’t listen to her What Should I Read Next? podcast, you should!). Each month I read a book that fit into the category she suggested, and, as the title suggested, it was actually a lot of fun.

To put my own spin on it, I tried to read books that fit into either speculative fiction or history, to complement my focus here on the blog.

As I went though the year I discovered authors I had never read before, which was great. I read good books, and not-so-good books, and rediscovered an old favourite. As I close up the series, I wanted to follow my previous pattern and do a wrap up of what I learned through this year of reading.

Just as a refresher, here are the categories, in order, and the books I read for each one. I didn’t do them all in the order that the “official” list suggested, and I borrowed one or two from the alternate list of “Reading for Growth” instead of “Reading for Fun”…which got me into a little trouble. I realized as I compiled my list I actually read two Books I was Excited to Read but Haven’t Read Yet because I has forgotten that I did this category at the beginning of the series instead of at the end, so I did it again. I also only read eleven books, not twelve, due to less time for reading that I thought I would have in the summer, and Way of Kings was a long book! Oops. Oh well.

Links included to each post, just in case you want to refresh your memory, or are visiting my blog for the first time (hi!).

January – Book I Chose for the Cover – Hot Lead, Cold Iron, by Ari Marmell

February – Book You Are Excited to Read or Borrow But Haven’t Read Yet – Queen of the Tearling, by Erika Johansen

March – Un-put-downable Book – Dark Matter, by Blake Crouch

April – Book Set in a Place You’ve Never Been But Would Like to Visit – Daughter of Smoke and Bone

May  – Book I’ve Already Read –  Book of the Dun Cow, by Walter Wangerin, Jr.

June – Book About Books or Reading – Ink and Bone (Great Library #1), by Rachel Caine

July – Book of Any Genre Addressing Current Events – Company Town, by Madeline Ashby

August/September – Book That Has More Than 600 Pages – Way of Kings, by Brandon Sanderson

October – Book Recommended by Someone With Great Taste – Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

November – Book in the Backlist of a New Favourite Author – The Forgotten Girl, by Rio Youers

December – Book You Were Excited to Buy or Borrow But Haven’t Read Yet – Kin of Cain, by Matthew Harffy

Without further ado, here’s my wrap-up of the 2017 Reading Challenge:

  1. The book I liked the least – Well, this was tricky. I didn’t hate any of the books, but unknownthere were a few that were definitely underwhelming. But, Queen of the Tearling has to be the one I enjoyed the least. The plot holes and thinly veiled hostility towards religion was just too much for me. Meh. A close runner-up would be Daughter of Ink and Bone. I actually gave that book two stars, and Queen I gave three, mainly because of the sexy angel element in Daughter. It’s plot is much tighter than Queen of the Tearling, though, so all in all Queen of the Tearling gets the dubious nod for the book I liked the least.

 

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2. Book I liked the best – in contrast, it was quite easy to pick the book I liked the best, even though there were strong contenders for this one. But far and away the book I enjoyed the most was The Book of the Dun Cow. I love so much about this book, from the writing, to the characters, to the plot, to the beauty of the story. I read it under the category of  The Book I’ve Already Read, and I’m so glad I did. I loved it way back when, and my appreciation for it has only deepened with time. Fantastic and highly recommended.

3. Book/s I wished I had written – It goes without saying that Book of the Dun Cow would

Unknown fall under this category also. I can only hope to ever write that well, and it’s the kind of book that hits me in all the right ways. But in surveying the other books on the list, I would have to say Way of Kings would be my second choice for the book I wish I had written.  I do love epic fantasy, and found the world-building and concepts explored here interesting. It’s a great feat to build a world and characters as ably as Sanderson does. But I would try to trim that beginning just a wee bit, if I were to do it. But, hey, he’s a multi-best-selling author and I’m just a wannabe, so what do I know anyway?

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4. Book/s I’m still thinking about  – again, Book of the Dun Cow. ‘Nuf said. But setting that one aside, I would have to say that the book that lingered with me the most was Dark Matter. Aside from being a terrific thriller and a fun read, it raised questions that lingered long after I finished it.

 

5. Book I was most disappointed in – the nod for this has to go to Company Unknown-2Town. I had high hopes for this one, and I really wanted to like it, but it just didn’t succeed in the ways that I wanted it to. Aspects of plot and characters were a bit too muddy, and the ending a little too out of left field. I want to support Canadian authors, and I was excited to read this one, which was picked as one of the Canada Reads books of 2017, but it just didn’t live up to my expectations of it. Bummer.

225x225bb6. Book that pleasantly surprised me – This was a pretty easy pick. I had been avoiding Ready Player One because I really dislike the “teen hero saves the world” plot, AKA Wesley Crusher. I haven’t read Ender’s Game, but I saw the movie and just couldn’t get into it because of that very reason. I figured that Ready Player One was just the same. But,my book guru recommended it, and as she and I have similar tastes in books, I gave it a try. And I liked it! Yes, perhaps the author got a bit carried away by the 1980s references and relied on them too much to carry the plot along, but, whatever. I found it a fun read. Really looking forward to what Spielberg is going to do with this on the big screen. If ever a book was made to be a movie, this one was!

7. Best writing – our of all the books I read this year for this challenge, there were three that stood out to me as having writing that is better than the rest:

  •   Book of the Dun Cow, by Walter Wangerin Jr. tops the list.  Wangerin’s poetic, yet5139RwDhQDL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_ simple style of writing here is a master class for writers. The voice of the book is distinct, with its folk-tale feel, and the reader falls under the story’s spell from the first page. But with the first introduction of Chauntecleer the Rooster and Mundo Cani Dog, you realize there is something more to this story than a simple children’s tale, depths which slowly unfurl along the way of the story’s slow telling. This book won the National Book Award for the U.S., and it is a deserving winner.
  • The Forgotten Girl, by Rio Youers. I fell in love with Youer’s writing when I read Weforgotten girlstlake Soul, one of the best books I’ve read in the last couple years and probably the one I have recommended to other people more than any other book recently. The Forgotten Girl didn’t have quite the same impact, but Youer’s skill in writing was still on display in this suspense thriller. I loved the way he wove a sweet love story into the midst of this story. I also love the portrayal of the main character and his father. Youers ability to write about love and relationships in more than just a superficial way is one I much admire, especially as he does it here in the midst of a super-charged plot. Very well done and a great read. Unknown
  • Way of Kings, by Brandon Sanderson. As I mentioned above, it’s not easy to create a whole new world and make it believable, but Sanderson does that here. Although I love big, long books, it’s been awhile since I’ve read any, just because I haven’t had the time. But this book reminded me why they are so much fun. Even though the beginning was a bit tough to get into, once I did I thoroughly enjoyed it. Now I understand why Sanderson is so very much admired for his epic fantasies!

All in all, I really enjoyed this year’s Year of Fun Reading. Thank you to Ann Bogel, the Modern Mrs. Darcy herself, who inspired this challenge. If any of you are wanting to do something similar, she has her new challenge for 2018 up on her blog right now.

However, I’m going to do something different for 2018. Come back next week for the reveal of my new Reading Challenge for the New Year!

 

YOFR: A Book About a Topic or Subject You Already Love

So…here we are at the final post for my 2017 Reading Challenge. Wow! How did the year go by so fast?

This last entry was a no-brainer for me. Recently I picked up Matthew Harffys novella, Kin of Cain, and it fits this month’s category perfectly. Like his other books, this story is set in 7th century Northumbria, in the year 630 AD.

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This book is a companion to his other, longer books, set in this era. The first of these, The Serpent Sword, I reviewed here on the blog. And the author was gracious enough to provide me an interview as well.

So, yes, I am a fan of Harffy’s work. I have purposely not read any of his other Bernicia Chronicles books yet, as I haven’t wanted his interpretation of 7th century Britain and it’s  people to colour my own, while I am in the midst of writing mine. But being that this one was a shorter story I thought I could risk it. And I’m glad I did!

The other books in the series are about Beobrand, a young man who goes on a quest to avenge his brother’s murder. This novella takes place before the events in the first book, The Serpent Sword, and the main character is Octa, Beobrand’s brother, who is a warrior in the court of King Edwin of Bernicia.

It is wintertime, and evil is stirring. Livestock and men have been found ripped apart, their bones gnawed upon. Edwin sends a group of his trusted warriors and thegns, Octa among them, into the icy marshes to find and kill the beast that is responsible for these atrocities.

This story is definitely engaging. It’s suspenseful and a little creepy here and there. And full disclosure, there is some gore, so if that kind of thing bothers you, be warned. The writing is solid. The details of seventh century Britain are done right, immersing you into this world. And Harffy includes a twist at the end that I really loved.

It’s a short, satisfying read, perfect if you want something that is not too long in the midst of this busy season. And if you want to delve more deeply into this fascinating world, Harffy’s Bernicia Chronicles now has four books, with a fifth to be released soon.

My rating: Five stars. Exciting, engaging tale of seventh century Northumbria, with good writing to boot.

 

2017 Reading Challenge: A Book in the Backlist of a New Favourite Author

This month I cheated a wee bit on my Year of Fun Reading Challenge. I was supposed to read a book in the backlist of a new favourite author. However, I decided instead to read the newest book of a new favourite author.

Last year I reviewed the book Westlake Soul, by Canadian writer Rio Youers, which quickly became the book I’ve told more people to read over the past year than any other.  I absolutely loved both the book and Youers’ writing style. So as per this month’s challenge  I thought I might read one of the books in his backlist, but I quickly discovered that up to the point where he wrote Westlake Soul, his books were definitely veering into (or firmly planted in) the horror genre.

While I have been known to read a smattering of horror books or, more likely, short stories, I find that I just can’t bring myself to read them at this stage in my life. My husband is often gone for work, and I rattle around in my empty nest quite a bit. And once night falls, it gets creepy when you are by yourself! *

However,  I have been eagerly awaiting Youers’ newest release, The Forgotten Girl (St. Martin’s Press, 2017) which is billed as a supernatural thriller. That, I can do. So it was with a great deal of anticipation that I settled down to read it.

forgotten girl

Love the cover. When Sally uses her psychic abilities she likens it to “letting the red bird fly” so the image is appropriate.

The Forgotten Girl opens with the main character, a twenty-six year-old dread-lock sporting, vegetarian, peace-loving street musician named Harvey Anderson, getting kidnapped and beat up by some unknown assailants. Harvey has no idea why they have taken him or why he is being subjected to this brutal beating. It’s quickly apparent that Harvey has been followed for some time, and that the thugs know all about him, and all about his dad, who came home from the Vietnam War wounded in both mind and body, and all about his girlfriend, Sally Starling, who recently has left Harvey.

The problem is, Harvey has no memory of Sally at all, even though they show him proof that he has been living with her for the past five years. They tell him that she has erased all memories of herself from his mind.  He soon realizes that she is the prize they are seeking. They were on Sally’s trail, and the trail led to him, and they want him to lead them to her.

But Harvey cannot. Only a vague flicker of a memory resurrects: a dancing girl, but with no features or any indication of where she was then or where she might be now. This is unfortunate for Harvey, for the next step in the interrogation is the creepy villain of the book who has set the thugs on Sally’s trail, whom Harvey calls “the spider”: Dominic Lang. Lang is a powerful psychic who crawls into Harvey’s mind and searches through it for any trace of the girl both he and Harvey once knew; a horrific violation that leaves Harvey shattered.

And angry. The thugs and the spider leave Harvey with the message that they will be watching and following him, waiting for him to lead him to Sally. But in the resurrection of that one tiny memory (which he begins to think that Sally left him deliberately, as a beacon to lead him to her), something else has been resurrected. Love.

The anger stirred me. Riled me. It also exposed the indefinite emotion inside–the one I’d been afraid of admitting to. And it was love. Of course it was. I loved a girl I couldn’t remember, and that made total sense to me. Because love is quite apart from memory. It runs deeper, like a hole in space that exists even after the star has exploded. 

As Harvey begins his journey to the girl he has forgotten, he gets deeper and deeper into a conspiracy that not even his paranoid father could make up, reaching to the top levels of government. The book races along a fast clip, always keeping you interested, but with Youers’ lyrical prose giving you moments of contemplation about the nature of love, memory, and loss.

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This could actually be a pretty good tag line for The Forgotten Girl

The characterizations in this novel are complex ones, and the relationships that Harvey discovers with both his damaged father and his “forgotten girl” are rich and true to life. And in the terrible circumstances he finds himself in, Harvey has to confront his worst demons, overcome the weaknesses he finds in himself, and discover strengths he didn’t know he had.

I particularly liked the way his relationship with his dad grew and changed in the book. Youers’ ability to portray family ties in interesting and realistic ways, so evident in Westlake Soul, shines in this novel as well. The only drawback is that I wish we could have seen more of Harvey and his dad together.

Both The Forgotten Girl and Westlake Soul touch on themes of memory, love, and courage. Both are about who you become when everything is taken away from you, and the roles of both our minds and emotions in our relationships with the ones we love. Westlake Soul sits a little higher on the shelf in my mind, but that is not to say that The Forgotten Girl is not worthy of much praise.

Bottom line, this book is about a man who loves a woman and loses her, and the depths that he will go to get her back, even if all he has left of her is a wisp of a memory. And that’s a story I can heartily approve of!

I really enjoyed it and look forward to what Rio Youers will do next.

My rating: 5 stars for excellent writing, a thrilling and interesting plot, and well-drawn characters.


*Ok, technically, I am not completely alone. I have my wonderful Labrador RetrieverX, but although he is good company I’m not entirely sure how useful he will be if the zombies come a-callin’. He’s a lover more than a fighter, if you know what I mean….